Lawsuit prompted effort to cut funds for Wisconsin watchdog

WIND: Although it’s already been approved by state officials, opponents continue to fight an Ohio wind farm, with the help of the state legislature’s most outspoken critic of clean energy. (Midwest Energy News)

ALSO:Indiana is looking very attractive” for future wind development. (Indianapolis Star)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’s MISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems. ***

WISCONSIN: How a legal challenge to a utility helped prompt efforts to cut funding for a state ratepayer advocate. (Madison Capital-Times)

OIL AND GAS:
• Enbridge seeks approval to replace a Minnesota pipeline with a history of failures. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• North Dakota will be allowed to intervene in a lawsuit challenging fracking rules for federal lands. (Bismarck Tribune)
• Michigan victims will receive $25 million in a settlement over leasing practices. (MLive)

SOLAR:
• A Wisconsin utility is proposing a 2 MW solar facility alongside a proposed natural gas plant. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
• A northwest Indiana program is “like a Groupon for solar.” (Post-Tribune)
• More Iowa farmers are installing solar arrays. (Cedar Rapids Gazette)

NUCLEAR: More Illinois mayors voice support for a bill to aid Exelon’s nuclear plants. (Joliet Herald-News)

MICHIGAN: A Michigan business event focuses heavily on clean energy: “Renewable energy and gas, that’s where the future is.” (Detroit Free Press)

COAL: We Energies says changes to federal coal ash rules won’t affect its Oak Creek power plant. (Racine Journal Times)

TRANSMISSION: Additional routes are being considered for a proposed transmission line between northern Minnesota and Manitoba. (Duluth News Tribune)

EFFICIENCY:
• Grand Rapids joins a national campaign to cut energy use in central business districts. (MLive)
• A federal court upholds EPA efficiency rules for heavy trucks. (The Hill)

ETHANOL: A report says 15 percent ethanol blends could help Illinois cut carbon emissions. (Biofuels Digest)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join the nation’s most successful women leaders in energy as they share their industry knowledge, strategies and experiences at the Leadership Conference for Women in Energy, June 2-3 in Indianapolis.***

TRANSPORTATION: The St. Louis transit agency tests an electric bus. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

COMMENTARY:
• Illinois should prioritize renewable energy, not Exelon’s nuclear plants. (Chicago Sun-Times)
• Michigan regulators are failing to protect a Detroit neighborhood from pollution. (Detroit News)
• Ohio taxpayers aren’t getting their fair share of the state’s oil and gas boom. (Cincinnati Enquirer)
• Minnesota should remember when clean energy was bipartisan. (MinnPost)

Wisconsin regulators give final approval for transmission line

MICHIGAN: Democratic legislators introduce bills to double the state’s renewable energy and efficiency standards. (Midwest Energy News)

TRANSMISSION: Wisconsin officials give final approval to a $580 million transmission line, opponents are expected to appeal. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’s MISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems.***

OIL AND GAS: A new study finds that oil and has drilling from 2000-2012 has consumed about 7 million acres of range, agricultural and forest land. (Midwest Energy News)

ALSO:
• The USGS releases a report linking thousands of earthquakes to oil and gas activity. (New York Times)
• North Dakota’s senate approves a bill to cut drilling taxes. (Bismarck Tribune)
• Oklahoma lawmakers advance a bill to limit local authority over oil and gas operations. (Tulsa World)

UTILITIES:
• MLive will host a live chat today with a Consumers Energy executive to discuss Michigan’s capacity shortfall (background here). (MLive, Midwest Energy News archive)
• Michigan regulators sign off on Wisconsin Energy’s acquisition of Integrys. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
• Illinois utilities push back against accusations they’re profiting from a recent capacity auction. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

CLIMATE: The White House announces an initiative to curb carbon emissions from agricultural practices. (Washington Post)

NUCLEAR:
• Dynegy says it may have to cut jobs in downstate Illinois if lawmakers pass a bill to help Exelon’s nuclear plants. (Crain’s Chicago Business)
• An environmental group appeals a license extension for a Missouri nuclear plant. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

SOLAR: Farmers discuss the benefits of solar power at a workshop in rural Iowa. (Agri News)

COAL:
• An Ohio utility says it is burning 15 percent less coal than it was a year ago. (Columbus Business First)
• An abandoned coal mine creates a safety hazard for an Indiana highway. (WTHI-TV)

ELECTRIC CARS: Entrepreneurs take on the problem of charging electric cars in cities with large numbers of apartment-dwellers. (New York Times)

TRANSPORTATION: U.S. automobile travel grows for the 12th consecutive month. (Reuters)

***SPONSORED LINK: What is the media’s role in addressing environmental challenges? Join Ensia magazine for a conversation with journalist Marc Gunther May 20 at the University of Minnesota. Free and open to the public.***

TECHNOLOGY: An Indiana high school installs floor tiles that generate electricity as students walk over them. (Indiana Daily Student)

COMMENTARY: Wind and solar will be our dominant energy sources sooner than you think. (Scientific American)

Liberal lawmakers target tax breaks for fossil fuels

EFFICIENCY: A Michigan organization helps small cities tackle a major backlog of efficiency projects, which can be difficult to obtain funding for. (Midwest Energy News)

POLICY: Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders introduce legislation that would end tax breaks for fossil fuels. (The Hill)

***SPONSORED LINK: Register for the Midwest Solar Expo today! Join the solar industry in advancing the Midwest solar market on May 13-14 in Minneapolis. Network with strategic players and learn about solar opportunities in your area.***

CLEAN POWER PLAN: A U.S. Chamber of Commerce director tells a North Dakota coal industry conference he expects EPA carbon rules will be defeated in court. (Bismarck Tribune)

COAL:
• The Sierra Club will launch TV ads today targeting two Minnesota utilities for their reliance on coal. (Midwest Energy News)
• A Wisconsin utility says it is recycling 100 percent of its coal waste, with a large portion going to produce gypsum for fertilizer. (WISN-TV)

WIND: Nebraska lawmakers advance a bill that will create a tax credit for wind energy. (Omaha World-Herald)

SOLAR:
• A solar industry group targets an Ohio utility, saying it uses “shady tactics” to “stifle competition” from rooftop solar. (Columbus Dispatch)
• A downtown St. Paul district cooling utility announces it will get roughly half its electricity from community solar. (St. Paul Pioneer Press)

MINNESOTA: Minnesota’s House and Senate, each controlled by a different party, approve drastically different energy bills. (Associated Press)

MISSOURI: More than 20 organizations announce the formation of the Missouri Clean Energy Coalition, which will focus on economic and health benefits of renewable power. (Columbia Missourian)

OHIO: A utility executive says “substantial turnover is a challenge” at the state’s Public Utility Commission. (Columbus Business First)

OIL AND GAS:
• A drilling executive predicts half of U.S. fracking companies will go out of business or be sold by the end of the year. (Bloomberg)
• Drilling companies test a technique to generate electricity from fracking wastewater. (Bloomberg)
• Opponents of a proposed oil pipeline rally at the Iowa capitol. (Des Moines Register)
• A Thai/Japanese joint venture has chosen Ohio as the site for a new petrochemical plant. (Columbus Business First)

HYDROPOWER: A Wisconsin co-op announces it will purchase a hydropower plant at a former paper mill site. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

***SPONSORED LINK: What is the media’s role in addressing environmental challenges? Join Ensia magazine for a conversation with journalist Marc Gunther May 20 at the University of Minnesota. Free and open to the public.***

TECHNOLOGY: How liquid-based “flow” batteries could provide energy storage for the grid. (New York Times)

COMMENTARY:
• On the Clean Power Plan, “history shows that utilities and states have successfully handled every significant change under the Clean Air Act for a generation. This time will be no different.” (U.S. News and World Report)
• Cutting funding for a Wisconsin ratepayer advocacy group “would not level the playing field — it would bulldoze it.” (Racine Journal Times)

White House calls for massive energy infrastructure upgrade

GRID: A White House report calls for a massive overhaul of the nation’s energy infrastructure. (Washington Post)

MISO:
• State legislators press MISO for answers on auction results that led to a spike in capacity prices for downstate Illinois. (EnergyWire)
• Exelon’s windfall from the higher prices won’t be as high as analysts projected. (Crain’s Chicago Business)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’sMISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems.***

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
• The North American Electric Reliability Corp. says a longer timeline will be needed to hit EPA carbon targets. (SNL)
• A study finds EPA carbon rules will create more than 270,000 jobs. (InsideClimate News)

OHIO: U.S. Rep. Marcy Kaptur says Gov. John Kasich “shouldn’t lead us backwards” on energy policy. (Toledo Blade)

OIL AND GAS:
• Oklahoma scientists say it is “very likely” that recent earthquakes were caused by oil and gas activities. (Greenwire)
• Oil field worker deaths attributed to “natural causes” may be linked to inhalation of toxic gases. (Wall Street Journal)
• Nebraska officials may decide today whether to approve a proposed injection well. (Rapid City Journal)
• A drilling company will be allowed to continue flaring after a North Dakota tribe refused an easement for a natural gas pipeline. (Bismarck Tribune)

UTILITIES:
• Utilities’ capital investments are largely responsible for increased rates in recent years. (Wall Street Journal)
• American Electric Power is increasingly likely to sell its unregulated Ohio power plants. (Columbus Dispatch)
• The Supreme Court says utilities can be sued over a 2001 spike in natural gas prices. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

TRANSMISSION: The Edison Electric Institute estimates there was more than $20 billion in new transmission investments in 2014. (SNL)

CLIMATE: A new report says capturing methane could be a low-cost way to fight climate change. (New York Times)

WASTE TO ENERGY: An Ohio landfill operator has made about $1 million in its first year of capturing and reselling methane and carbon dioxide. (Columbus Dispatch)

NUCLEAR: A study estimates plans to support Exelon’s Illinois nuclear plants will cost ratepayers $1.6 billion over five years. (Quad-City Times)

SOLAR: An Indiana town plans for a second solar farm. (Anderson Herald Bulletin)

ELECTRIC CARS: An Ohio wildlife refuge dedicates two new charging stations. (Toledo Blade)

EFFICIENCY: The U.S. House approves a bill to create a voluntary efficiency standard for commercial buildings. (The Hill)

TECHNOLOGY: Tesla is expected to announce later this month a home battery and “very large” grid-scale battery for energy storage. (Bloomberg)

***SPONSORED LINK: What is the media’s role in addressing environmental challenges? Join Ensia magazine for a conversation with journalist Marc Gunther May 20 at the University of Minnesota. Free and open to the public.***

COMMENTARY:
• Polls show broad support for clean energy in Illinois. (Huffington Post)
• How strengthening Illinois’ efficiency standard could drive billions in new investment. (The Equation)

CORRECTION: It is Wisconsin’s state legislature that is moving to cut funding for a consumer advocacy organization, not Minnesota. The state was incorrect in an item in yesterday’s digest.

Emissions rise, but not as fast as economic growth

CLIMATE: U.S. carbon emissions rose slightly in 2014, but at a slower rate than economic growth. (The Hill)

BIOENERGY:
• Iowa seeks to become a leader in biofuels made from animal manure and other organic waste. (Midwest Energy News)
• The Detroit Zoo is raising funds for a biodigester that will be powered by the 400 tons of manure produced by its animals each year. (MLive)

***SPONSORED LINK: Register for the Midwest Solar Expo today! Join the solar industry in advancing the Midwest solar market on May 13-14 in Minneapolis. Network with strategic players and learn about solar opportunities in your area.***

PIPELINES: Critics say the federal agency overseeing pipeline safety is understaffed and too closely tied to the industry it regulates. (Politico)

UTILITIES: Chicago ends its municipal aggregation program after determining it can’t provide a better deal for customers. (Crain’s Chicago Business)

ILLINOIS: Clean-energy advocates square off with utilities over three major pieces of energy legislation. (Utility Dive)

SOLAR: Chicago officials pursue community solar gardens. (Curbed Chicago)

GRID:
• Illinois’ attorney general has “serious concerns” about a MISO capacity auction that will cause costs to soar in part of Illinois. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
• RES Americas announces a new 6 MW storage facility in Ohio. (ReNews)

COAL: Plans to shut down an Indiana coal plant may face opposition from a small railroad that depends heavily on coal shipments. (Indianapolis Star)

OIL AND GAS:
• North Dakota passes a bill calling for tougher pipeline oversight. (UPI)
• A Thai company is considering Ohio as a site for a plant to produce petrochemicals from natural gas. (Columbus Business First)
• A drilling company is doing damage control after setting off a 3,000 acre wildfire in North Dakota. (Bismarck Tribune)
• Kansas is seeing fewer earthquakes after enacting new restrictions on fracking wastewater disposal. (Hutchinson News)

EFFICIENCY:
• Cuyahoga County, Ohio launches a program aimed at raising $120 million for energy efficiency efforts. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
• A Minnesota utility exceeds state efficiency targets for the fifth year in a row. (Mesabi Daily News)

***SPONSORED LINK: What is the media’s role in addressing environmental challenges? Join Ensia magazine for a conversation with journalist Marc Gunther May 20 at the University of Minnesota. Free and open to the public.***

WILDLIFE: An Iowa utility takes steps to protect birds after an eagle was recently electrocuted on a power line. (Cedar Rapids Gazette)

COMMENTARY: 
• Why cutting funding for a Minnesota Wisconsin consumer watchdog is “clearing the field for the utilities in rate cases.” (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
• “Now is not the time to revert to old policies” in Minnesota. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• Exelon says Dynegy’s opposition to a Low Carbon Portfolio Standard bill is so it can make more money off of its coal plants. (Reboot Illinois)

Feds impose speed limit, other safety rules on oil trains

OIL TRAINS: Federal regulators issue new orders to improve oil train safety, including a 40 mph speed limit through urban areas. (New York Times)

EPA:
• Two new reports say low-income residents will benefit financially from carbon reductions. (Midwest Energy News)
• A grid operator’s study finds a carbon price of $45 per ton would cause Kansas and other states to move away from coal. (Topeka Capital-Journal)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’s MISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems.***

WISCONSIN:
• A Milwaukee-area business group is behind the legislative push to cut a state grant for a consumer advocacy organization that has opposed it in the past. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
• A state utility regulator’s comment on climate change earns a “false” rating from PolitiFact. (Tampa Bay Times)

MISO: Auction results causing capacity prices to spike in an Illinois region are generating controversy among stakeholders, with a consumer group calling them “impossible to justify” and a utility saying they “appear to be nonsensical.” (EnergyWire, Belleville News-Democrat)

SOLAR:
• Ohio solar developers seek business out of state in the wake of the state’s energy policy “freeze.” (Columbus Dispatch)
• Solar industry groups fight an uphill battle to save a key tax break in Congress. (CQ Roll Call)

COAL: A Nebraska utility says it will convert a coal plant unit to be the first utility-scale plant in the U.S. to run on hydrogen. (Lincoln Journal Star)

TRANSMISSION: A wind-energy transmission line still faces hurdles in Missouri. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

NUCLEAR: Community leaders in an Illinois town rally to back legislation that would benefit a nearby nuclear plant. (Springfield State Journal-Register)

BIOFUELS: Minnesota truckers sue to end the state’s biodiesel mandate. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

***SPONSORED LINK: What is the media’s role in addressing environmental challenges? Join Ensia magazine for a conversation with journalist Marc Gunther May 20 at the University of Minnesota. Free and open to the public.***

TRANSPORTATION: Shippers on the Ohio River are moving more oil and petroleum products, and less coal. (Charleston State Journal)

COMMENTARY: A suburban Cleveland mayor backs FirstEnergy’s plan to guarantee income for some of its power plants. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

States challenging EPA rule have a rough day in court

CLEAN POWER PLAN: A panel of federal judges appeared skeptical about arguments from states challenging EPA carbon rules. (Greenwire)

ALSO:
• A study finds that most states have begun planning to comply with the Clean Power Plan, even those that are challenging it. (Midwest Energy News)
• A think tank with connections to the Koch political network is distributing misleading information about the costs of EPA carbon rules. (InsideClimate News)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’s MISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems. ***

CLIMATE: A survey finds a large majority of Americans support a carbon tax. (ClimateWire)

WIND: Big companies are competing with utilities in the wind market. (Utility Dive)

SOLAR:
• A St. Paul college will offset all of its electricity use with solar power. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• A Minnesota great-grandmother, who’s turning 90 next month, explains why she’s installing solar panels. (WCCO)

COAL: Murray Energy finalizes a deal to partner with Foresight Energy. (Charleston State Journal)

OIL AND GAS:
• Ohio regulators did not issue any new permits for drilling in the first week of April. (Columbus Business First)
• The oil downturn means “man camps” are starting to shut down. (Bloomberg)

NUCLEAR: The Energy Department will award more than $5 million for students to study nuclear energy. (The Hill)

UTILITIES: A Michigan utility says it has spent more than $1 billion with in-state suppliers over the past four years. (MLive)

WASTE-TO-ENERGY: An Iowa town’s waste-to-energy plan shifts from ethanol to biogas. (Cedar Rapids Gazette)

***SPONSORED LINK: What is the media’s role in addressing environmental challenges? Join Ensia magazine for a conversation with journalist Marc Gunther May 20 at the University of Minnesota. Free and open to the public.***

COMMENTARY:
• “Though electric choice poses challenges, it’s important in principle that consumers can purchase service outside of a monopoly.” (Detroit News)
• North Dakota needs to take responsibility for oil safety. (Bismarck Tribune)
• An Xcel Energy executive says it’s moving toward a cleaner portfolio “by gradually and responsibly dialing back the output from our coal plants.” (MinnPost)

CORRECTION: An item in Wednesday’s digest incorrectly stated that Michigan lawmakers approved language for a ballot measure to ban fracking. The language was approved by the Board of State Canvassers.

Wisconsin lawmakers want to end grant for ratepayer group

SOLAR: Critics say a Michigan utility is trying to “monopolize” community solar in its territory. (Midwest Energy News)

ALSO:
• Three nonprofits sue to obtain correspondence between Indiana lawmakers and utilities related to a controversial anti-solar bill. (Indianapolis Star)
• A Nebraska town is being considered for a possible $20 million solar project. (Kearney Hub)

***SPONSORED LINK: Establish your company as a strategic player in the expanding Midwest solar market and Sponsor this year’s Midwest Solar Expo taking place May 13-14 in Minneapolis. Learn more about remaining sponsorship opportunities.***

WISCONSIN: State lawmakers want to eliminate a state grant for an organization that advocates on behalf of ratepayers. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

NUCLEAR: A recent MISO capacity auction will likely create a windfall for one of Exelon’s Illinois nuclear plants. (Crain’s Chicago Business)

COAL:
• Ohio-based Murray Energy blames President Obama and West Virginia tax policy as it lays off more than 200 workers. (The Hill)
• “An enormous amount of change and innovation” is pushing coal plants out of the market. (Politico)
• A coal industry challenge to the Clean Power Plan employs some unusual legal arguments. (InsideClimate News)
• An Illinois coal mine will remain closed because of elevated carbon monoxide levels from a fire last year. (Associated Press)
• A U.S. House committee approves a bill that would give states authority to regulate coal ash. (Associated Press)

OHIO: The new chair of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio says “there is going to be a level playing field at the commission.” (Columbus Business First)

OIL AND GAS:
• An environmental group’s study says states are taking a lax approach to dealing with drilling waste. (InsideClimate News)
• Oklahoma University’s president disputes media reports that he met with a drilling executive to discuss earthquake research. (EnergyWire)
• A South Dakota judge removes 22 interveners from a Keystone XL case for failing to meet a pre-trial deadline. (Rapid City Journal) 

***SPONSORED LINK: What is the media’s role in addressing environmental challenges? Join Ensia magazine for a conversation with journalist Marc Gunther May 20 at the University of Minnesota. Free and open to the public.***

UTILITIES: Why some Illinois utility customers will see lower bills. (Crain’s Chicago Business)

COMMENTARY: Why “no fuel costs” is the trump card for renewable energy. (The Energy Collective)

Utility executive questions why solar is the ‘bad boy’

SOLAR: Unlike their counterparts in Wisconsin, Minnesota regulators recently rejected a proposed increase in fixed charges. But advocates are unsure if that will change the course of the debate. (Midwest Energy News)

ALSO: An NRG Energy executive questions why solar is the “bad boy” for utilities. (Greentech Media)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’s MISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems. ***

COAL:
• FirstEnergy will close three Ohio coal plants today. (Associated Press)
• Lansing, Michigan’s municipal utility begins developing a plan to replace an iconic coal plant. (Lansing State Journal)

OIL AND GAS:
• Michigan lawmakers election officials approve petition language for a proposed fracking ban. (Detroit News)
• North Dakota sees its second month in a row of production declines. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

OHIO: Companies that generate their own electricity in Ohio may owe additional taxes. (Columbus Business First)

POLITICS:
• Critics say ALEC leaders are trying to “speak out of both sides of their mouth” on climate change as more companies leave the group. (InsideClimate News)
• Tom Steyer’s political action group targets Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker for waging a “war on science.” (Madison Capital Times)

TRANSPORTATION: Minneapolis-St. Paul’s transit agency will test electric buses next week. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

ETHANOL: A University of Nebraska study pegs the economic impact of the state’s ethanol industry at $5 billion. (Lincoln Journal Star)

WIND: A Minnesota wind developer has dropped its effort to get a legislative fix for a project’s expiring leases. (Minnesota Watchdog)

MEDIA: A survey finds fewer TV meteorologists reject climate science. (Minnesota Public Radio)

***SPONSORED LINK: What is the media’s role in addressing environmental challenges? Join Ensia magazine for a conversation with journalist Marc Gunther May 20 at the University of Minnesota. Free and open to the public.***

GRID: An Illinois utility will use drones to help repair power outages. (EnergyWire)

COMMENTARY:
• States so far aren’t heeding Mitch McConnell’s call to ignore the Clean Power Plan. (NRDC Switchboard)
• The action for solar power is moving from the coasts to the Midwest. (Columbia Daily Tribune)

Could climate censorship spread beyond Wisconsin?

OHIO: Critics say Ohio’s Energy Mandates Study Committee has so far been overly focused on the drawbacks of clean energy, without considering benefits. (Midwest Energy News)

CLIMATE: Advocates say Wisconsin and Florida may be just the beginning of a broader effort to chill climate change discussion at state agencies. (InsideClimate News)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’s MISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems. ***

PIPELINES: A Minnesota judge issues a favorable ruling for a proposed Bakken oil pipeline, but state regulators will have the final say. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

ALSO: Tribes continue to push back against Keystone XL. (The Hill)

MICHIGAN: In a debate over Michigan’s electric choice law, schools and other customers say utilities are conjuring up a “doomsday scenario” to justify eliminating competition. (Detroit News)

COAL: A coal-dependent Ohio co-op calls on members to help with “battling on the legislative front” against EPA carbon rules and other policies. (Paulding Progress)

EPA: Federal judges will hear arguments this week from states trying to block the Clean Power Plan. (Greenwire)

OIL AND GAS:
• Developers consider a new pipeline to move natural gas products out of Ohio. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)
• North Dakota will study using oilfield waste in road construction. (Associated Press)

***SPONSORED LINK: What is the media’s role in addressing environmental challenges? Join Ensia magazine for a conversation with journalist Marc Gunther May 20 at the University of Minnesota. Free and open to the public.***

TRANSMISSION: Developers of the Grain Belt Express line submit plans to Illinois regulators. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

COMMENTARY:
• Why expanding renewable energy will require investing in the grid. (Forbes)
• How energy efficiency is disrupting utility business models. (The Energy Collective)