Minnesota regulators OK largest solar project in state history

SOLAR: Minnesota regulators approve the largest solar project in state history, with more than 100 MW to be built at 21 locations. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

OHIO: The chair of the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio delays a decision on income guarantees for some power plants. (Columbus Dispatch)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join the nation’s most successful women leaders in energy as they share their industry knowledge, strategies and experiences at the Leadership Conference for Women in Energy, June 2-3 in Indianapolis.***

UTILITIES: Xcel Energy seeks a significant fixed charge increase in Wisconsin, a more modest proposal was rejected by Minnesota regulators earlier this year. (La Crosse Tribune, Midwest Energy News archive)

ALSO: Illinois’ attorney general accuses Dynegy of manipulating electricity markets in a recent capacity auction that led to a price spike in the southern part of the state. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

EFFICIENCY: A report from the city of Minneapolis finds large office buildings tend to be higher performers on energy efficiency. (Midwest Energy News)

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
• Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker says EPA carbon rules are “unworkable” for his state. (The Hill)
• Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback signs a bill requiring the state to develop a plan to comply with carbon regulations. (Topeka Capital-Journal)

OIL AND GAS:
• New facilities in Ohio to process a byproduct from drilling pose a pollution hazard. (Columbus Dispatch)
• Rising oil prices mean a North Dakota tax break for producers won’t go into effect. (Associated Press)

FRAC SAND: A report finds Wisconsin supplied nearly half of U.S. demand for frac sand in 2014. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

COAL:
• The end of the coal era is near for an Indianapolis-area power plant. (Indianapolis Star)
• A Wisconsin county balks at the cost of performing an air quality study in a neighborhood near an exposed coal pile. (Green Bay Press-Gazette)

MORE SOLAR:
• A Minnesota lawmaker praises a rural co-op’s investment in solar power. (Rochester Post-Bulletin)
• An Iowa utility proposes a community solar project. (KCRG) 

WIND: Illinois lawmakers advance a bill to clarify local regulation of wind farms. (Carbondale Southern Illinoisan)

GRID: A report finds utility investment in energy storage has increased 18 percent over last year. (ClimateWire)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Ford opens up its electric vehicle patents to competitors. (CBS Detroit)

COMMENTARY: An Ohio bill letting counties bypass state wind turbine rules “would at least mitigate the state’s ill-advised change in setback standards.” (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

Ohio Republicans tout economic benefits of wind power

SOLAR: A Detroit-area community, left with most of its streetlights removed following a utility settlement, is hoping to re-light its streets using solar power. (Midwest Energy News)

ALSO: A Minnesota county sets new regulations for large solar projects. (Mankato Free Press)

***SPONSORED LINK: Learn about the latest in renewable energy and sustainability in Central Wisconsin at The Energy Fair, June 19-21. Features include keynote speaker John Wellinghoff, workshops, exhibitors, entertainment, and more.***

WIND: Ohio Republicans point to a planned Amazon data center as an example of how wind energy can be beneficial to the state. (Toledo Blade)

COAL:
• A closer look at the campaign to shut down coal plants in the U.S. (Politico)
• As natural gas displaces coal in the Ohio Valley, fewer jobs are available. (Intelligencer / Wheeling News-Register)
Stricter rail car standards will also impact a North Dakota coal gasification plant. (Bismarck Tribune)

POLITICS: Activist Tom Steyer says he plans to put Republican presidential candidates on the record about climate change. (The Hill)

PIPELINES:
• A tribal environmental group won’t be allowed to present information on climate change in upcoming Keystone XL proceedings in South Dakota. (Rapid City Journal)
• Iowa’s state archaeologist says a proposed pipeline should face the same standards as other projects for its potential to disrupt archaeological sites. (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
• One of Michigan’s U.S. senators says he is “very concerned” about the safety of pipelines running beneath the Straits of Mackinac, and protesters heckle Gov. Rick Snyder over the issue. (MLive, Michigan Now)

POLLUTION: A company accused of dumping oil field waste into an Ohio stream is expected to change its plea. (Youngstown Vindicator)

BIOENERGY: Industry leaders in Iowa press for legislation that would create new tax credits that would encourage biofuel refineries to diversify into other products. (Iowa Farmer Today)

TRANSMISSION: Developers file for a Canadian permit for a proposed transmission connection across Lake Erie. (Transmission & Distribution World)

***SPONSORED LINK: The Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association presents its annual Michigan Renewable Energy Fair June 26-27. Features include an electric vehicle showcase, workshops, renewable energy demonstrations, kids’ activities, and much more! ***

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: A Dayton-area grocery store chain is adding EV chargers that customers can use for free. (Dayton Business Journal)

COMMENTARY:
• Why a Minnesota cosmetics company wants the state to expand its renewable energy standard. (Midwest Energy News)
• In Ohio, “The utilities are on the wrong side of history.” (Cincinnati Enquirer)

Illinois lawmakers ignore Exelon’s nuclear warnings

NUCLEAR: Despite dire warnings from Exelon, Illinois lawmakers appear unlikely to act on a bill to help the utility’s nuclear plants — or any other energy legislation — until this fall. (Crain’s Chicago Business)

EFFICIENCY: Schools and small businesses will suffer if Ohio continues to roll back its energy efficiency standards, industry leaders say. (Midwest Energy News)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join the nation’s most successful women leaders in energy as they share their industry knowledge, strategies and experiences at the Leadership Conference for Women in Energy, June 2-3 in Indianapolis.***

SOLAR:Solar is the new shale,” becoming the fastest growing new source of U.S. electricity. (Bloomberg)

GRID: Duke Energy will build a 2 MW energy storage facility at a shuttered Ohio coal plant. (Bloomberg)

COAL: An appeals court overturns a decision allowing a mining company to tunnel beneath an Ohio state park. (Columbus Dispatch)

PIPELINES:
• Michigan environmental groups call for removal of two pipelines running beneath the Straits of Mackinac. (MLive)
• A lone holdout explains why he’s refusing to let a pipeline cross his land in North Dakota. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

OIL AND GAS:
• Wisconsin leaders join U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin in calling for tougher safety rules for crude oil trains. (La Crosse Tribune)
• Developers of a planned ethane cracker plant in Ohio say they were lured to the state by an “aggressive incentive package.” (Columbus Business First)

TRANSMISSION: The long approval process for new transmission lines could slow the timeline for cutting U.S. carbon emissions. (Bloomberg)

WISCONSIN: A judge upholds a decision by state regulators allowing a utility to make customers pay for converting a Milwaukee coal plant to gas. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

EPA:
• A former North Dakota regulator, now a congressman, vows to fight the Clean Power Plan. (ClimateWire)
• A federal court rejects a challenge from Kansas officials to the agency’s rejection of its plan to comply with the cross-state pollution rule. (The Hill)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Utilities see economic opportunity in electric vehicle charging stations. (EnergyWire)

BIOENERGY: Wisconsin officials will allow increased emissions from a biodigester to help it avoid violations. (Wisconsin State Journal)

WIND: A new wind farm will increase a Kansas utility’s wind capacity to 1,300 megawatts. (Topeka Capital Journal)

COMMENTARY: The Bismarck Tribune calls for transparency in the regulatory process for a proposed pipeline.

Wave of coal retirements predicted under climate rule

MICHIGAN: Proposed changes to Michigan’s utility rate structure would create one of the widest divides between residential and industrial rates in the U.S. (Midwest Energy News)

CLEAN POWER PLAN: The Energy Information Administration projects a massive wave of coal retirements under the Clean Power Plan. (EnergyWire)

***SPONSORED LINK: Learn about the latest in renewable energy and sustainability in Central Wisconsin at The Energy Fair, June 19-21. Features include keynote speaker John Wellinghoff, workshops, exhibitors, entertainment, and more.***

MINNESOTA: Gov. Mark Dayton vetoes a jobs bill containing several energy provisions. (Associated Press, Minneapolis Star Tribune)

PIPELINES:
• Cleanup of a 2013 North Dakota pipeline spill will take at least two more years. (Associated Press)
• An upcoming regulatory hearing will determine the fate of a proposed oil pipeline through Minnesota. (Minnesota Watchdog)
• Landowners along a proposed pipeline route have joined together to seek “the best easement that’s ever been written in North Dakota to protect the landowner.” (Forum News Service)

OIL AND GAS:
• The oil industry launches a campaign against possible tax increases in Ohio. (Columbus Dispatch)
• Some Kansas counties may have to increase property taxes as gas revenues fall. (Associated Press)

SOLAR:
• Minnesota’s legislative auditor will investigate $7 million in development loans for a solar manufacturer. (MinnPost)
• A consultant’s report finds ample space at Milwaukee’s airport for a proposed solar farm. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
• A Michigan engineer develops a website to help guide residents’ decisions on solar power. (Houghton Daily Mining Gazette)
• A Minnesota town considers changes to its zoning code to allow commercial solar farms. (Northfield News)

WIND: A Berkshire Hathaway subsidiary buys more wind farms. (Lincoln Journal Star)

***SPONSORED LINK: The Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association presents its annual Michigan Renewable Energy Fair June 26-27. Features include an electric vehicle showcase, workshops, renewable energy demonstrations, kids’ activities, and much more! ***

COAL: BNSF Railway settles a 10-year-old dispute with utilities over rates for shipping coal. (Lincoln Journal Star)

COMMENTARY:
• The economics of an Ohio wind farm show the need for stronger clean energy policy. (Crain’s Cleveland Business)
Questions remain unanswered about a proposed Illinois coal mine. (Champaign-Urbana News-Gazette)
• Why Ohio’s energy law “freeze” is bad for business. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

Murray Energy to lay off 1,800 workers in Ohio, West Virginia

NOTE TO READERS: Midwest Energy News will be taking a break for Memorial Day. The email digest will return on Tuesday, May 26.

COAL: Murray Energy is expected to announce layoffs of 1,800 workers in Ohio and West Virginia today, as the company’s CEO predicts a wave of bankruptcies in the industry. (Wall Street Journal, Pittsburgh Business Times)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’s MISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems.***

UTILITIES:
• Wisconsin regulators approve Wisconsin Energy’s takeover of Integrys, but concerns remain in Illinois over who will pay for mismanagement of a Chicago gas line replacement project. (Green Bay Press-Gazette, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
• Illinois legislation could mean customers of other utilities pay for Exelon’s power plants. (St. Louis Post Dispatch)

COAL ASH:
• Ameren works with a Missouri county to block environmental challenges to a proposed coal ash landfill. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
• Experts say the Justice Department’s crackdown on Duke Energy “should terrify other utilities.” (InsideClimate News)

PIPELINES:
• A coalition pushes for stronger oversight of aging pipelines running beneath Michigan’s Straits of Mackinac. (Huffington Post)
• Michigan lawmakers seek an assessment of what’s been learned since the 2010 Kalamazoo River oil spill. (Detroit News)
• North Dakota will begin holding public hearings on a proposed pipeline that has seen strong opposition in Iowa. (Bismarck Tribune)

OIL AND GAS: A drilling company says it may resume operations in Ohio sooner than expected. (Columbus Business First)

WIND:
• A bill to let Ohio counties override strict state wind setback rules is “in its early stages yet.” (Van Wert Times Bulletin)
• A Detroit suburb moves ahead with plans to install two wind turbines at a brownfield site. (The News-Herald)
• Developers say proposed noise rules in a Nebraska county would effectively prohibit new wind projects there. (Lincoln Journal Star)

TRANSMISSION: Minnesota regulators approve a certificate of need for a transmission line connecting the state with Canada. (Mesabi Daily News)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES:
• Minnesota regulators approve lower rates for off-peak electric vehicle charging. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• The Obama administration withdraws its goal of having 1 million electric vehicles on the road by this year. (Bloomberg)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join the nation’s most successful women leaders in energy as they share their industry knowledge, strategies and experiences at the Leadership Conference for Women in Energy, June 2-3 in Indianapolis.***

TRANSPORTATION:
• More school districts explore propane as an alternative to diesel to fuel buses. (New York Times)
• Wisconsin lawmakers propose a $25 tax on bicycle sales. (Madison Capital Times)

COMMENTARY: How expanding choice could help cut costs in Michigan. (Detroit News)

Iowa landowners rally to support eminent domain changes

TRANSMISSION: Michigan lawmakers push a plan to improve the electrical connection between the Upper and Lower peninsulas. (Midwest Energy News)

EFFICIENCY: Minneapolis and Chicago are again among the top U.S. cities for energy efficiency, according to a new report; other Midwest cities, such as St. Louis, remain below average. (Midwest Energy News, St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

***SPONSORED LINK: Learn about the latest in renewable energy and sustainability in Central Wisconsin at The Energy Fair, June 19-21. Features include keynote speaker John Wellinghoff, workshops, exhibitors, entertainment, and more.***

OIL: North Dakota’s new oil tax law could threaten a revenue-sharing agreement with the Three Affiliated Tribes. (Associated Press)

PIPELINES:
• Iowa landowners rally at the state capitol to support tougher restrictions on eminent domain. (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
• Congressional Republicans want to turn over approval of natural gas pipelines to the Interior Department. (The Hill)

NATURAL GAS: Illinois regulators say a utility has mismanaged a program to replace natural gas pipelines beneath Chicago streets. (Chicago Tribune)

WIND: A Wisconsin brewery enters an agreement to purchase 100 percent of its power from wind. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

ETHANOL:
• Ethanol backers launch an initiative focusing on the public health benefits of the fuel. (Greenwire)
• A proposal to expand ethanol use in Chicago is still alive after a sweep of other pending legislation. (Chicago Tribune)

SOLAR: A series of workshops will help Wisconsin farmers learn more about solar power. (Wisconsin Ag Connection)

NUCLEAR: An Illinois nuclear plant is back online after a scheduled refueling outage. (Bloomington Pantagraph)

GRID: An Ohio utility unveils its new squirrel-proof substation. (Transmission & Distribution World)

TECHNOLOGY: Can waste heat be effectively converted into electricity? (Greentech Media)

COMMENTARY: How new technology will greatly accelerate the spread of wind energy. (NRDC Switchboard)

Report: ‘Freeze’ puts thousands of Ohio energy jobs at risk

OHIO: A new report finds 89,000 clean energy jobs in Ohio, which are now at risk because of a legislative “freeze” to the state’s renewable energy and efficiency standards. (Toledo Blade)

ALSO: Opponents push back against American Electric Power’s demand for a quick decision on its latest plan to guarantee income for its coal plants. (Columbus Business First)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’s MISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems.***

TRANSMISSION:
• A new report offers tactics for developers of transmission lines to avoid having to use eminent domain. (Midwest Energy News)
• A transmission line connecting Minnesota to Canada will be a test case for a Department of Energy effort to streamline the approval process. (SNL)

CLIMATE: South Dakota is the latest state to adopt science standards requiring students to learn about climate change. (Midwest Energy News)

MINNESOTA: Legislation passed literally at the last minute, and facing a possible veto, will allow municipal utilities and co-ops to impose additional charges on solar customers, while opening the door to lower rates for large industrial users. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

UTILITIES:
• FirstEnergy’s new CEO defuses shareholder anger over the utility’s direction. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
• Protesters confront shareholders of a Madison utility for its reliance on coal. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
• A new report outlines alternative business models for utilities. (Greentech Media)

WIND:
• An Energy Department report says taller turbines could bring wind energy to all 50 states. (New York Times)
• Wildlife advocates say new rules are needed to protect birds from wind farms. (Associated Press)

POLLUTION: Marathon Petroleum will pay $3 million in fines and spend $2.8 million on upgrades to settle Clean Air Act violations at facilities in Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky. (Associated Press)

PIPELINES: Iowa officials are investigating a landowner’s charge that he was offered prostitutes by a pipeline developer. (Cedar Rapids Gazette)

FRACKING: A study finds high levels of airborne pollutants at drilling sites in an Ohio county. (InsideClimate News)

COAL:
• Critics say St. Louis-based Peabody Energy was exploiting the Ebola crisis to promote coal. (The Guardian)
• Co-ops want federal regulators to re-assess how railroad coal shipping charges are determined. (Electric Co-op Today)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join the nation’s most successful women leaders in energy as they share their industry knowledge, strategies and experiences at the Leadership Conference for Women in Energy, June 2-3 in Indianapolis.***

SOLAR: A Michigan man wants to start a buying club to help neighbors save money on solar panels. (Houghton Mining Gazette)

NATURAL GAS: Operations begin at a new Illinois power plant. (Associated Press)

Ohio utility to try again on coal plant income guarantees

OHIO: An Ohio utility revises its proposal for income guarantees for its coal plants after an earlier version was rejected by state regulators. (Columbus Dispatch)

ALSO: The controversy over the utility plans, which opponents characterize as “bailouts,” is just the latest to involve Ohio’s Davis-Besse nuclear plant. (Columbus Dispatch)

***SPONSORED LINK: Learn about the latest in renewable energy and sustainability in Central Wisconsin at The Energy Fair, June 19-21. Features include keynote speaker John Wellinghoff, workshops, exhibitors, entertainment, and more.***

COAL:
• Illinois lawmakers declare war on “garbage coal” from Wyoming, saying the state’s power plants should be fueled locally. (EnergyWire)
• FirstEnergy shareholders plan to protest the utility’s reliance on coal today. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
InsideClimate News launches a series on the decline of the coal industry.

UTILITIES:
• A Wisconsin utility is pursuing another increase in fixed charges. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
• How a Minnesota co-op has managed to keep energy prices low. (Utility Dive)

SOLAR:
• Another Minnesota co-op offers community solar to its members. (St. Cloud Times)
• The developer of Nebraska’s first large-scale solar farm is changing tactics in hope of receiving faster approval. (Lincoln Journal Star)

GRID: An Indiana utility plans a $25 million energy storage facility. (Indianapolis Business Journal)

OIL AND GAS:
• Federal regulators issue a warning about toxic airborne chemicals at drilling sites following the deaths of nine workers in North Dakota and elsewhere. (Associated Press)
A new documentary explore the deaths of more than 50 North Dakota oil field workers since 2008. (Minnesota Public Radio)

PIPELINES: A former Iowa legislator is arrested in a protest at the governor’s office against a proposed oil pipeline. (Radio Iowa)

FRAC SAND: A frac sand facility in Wisconsin will lay off 30 workers as it slows down production this summer. (La Crosse Tribune)

MICHIGAN: The state’s new energy agency began operations Monday. (MLive)

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
• FERC wants climate rules to include a “safety valve” to ensure grid reliability. (The Hill)
• A new study finds energy efficiency will be the lowest-cost way to meet Clean Power Plan targets. (Washington Post)

COMMENTARY: Why wood pellets aren’t a climate solution, at least not in the short-term. (Forbes)

To clear air at parks, Minnesota coal plant to cut emissions

NET METERING: Ohio regulators are considering limitations to the state’s net metering rules that could resolve a utility’s Supreme Court challenge. (Midwest Energy News)

POLLUTION:
• A Minnesota utility agrees to cut coal plant emissions to reduce haze at nearby national parks. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• Medical groups say Indiana regulators are pushing back against federal pollution rules at the expense of public health. (Indianapolis Star)

***SPONSORED LINK: EPA’s section 111(D) is driving generation and transmission in MISO. Infocast’s MISO Market Summit 2015 will bring policy-makers together with utility, IPP and DR executives to explore the opportunities to solve reliability and power market problems.***

OIL AND GAS:
• A drilling CEO pressed for the dismissal of Oklahoma scientists studying links between oil and gas activity and earthquakes, according to an email archive. (Bloomberg)
• A wastewater disposal well near the site of Oklahoma’s largest earthquake may have been drilled too deep. (EnergyWire)
• Experts say much of Michigan’s future natural gas supply will come from out of state. (Associated Press)

PIPELINES: A Michigan pipeline project is moving forward despite a township’s opposition. (MLive)

SOLAR:
• Michigan regulators grant conditional approval for the state’s first utility community solar program. (Crain’s Detroit Business)
• Construction of Minnesota’s largest solar project — 100 MW across up to 24 sites — could begin this fall. (Rochester Post-Bulletin)
• An Illinois town will unveil a new solar system that will help power its recreational facilities. (Edwardsville Intelligencer)
• Solar advocates file their arguments in a challenge to a Wisconsin regulatory decision allowing higher fixed charges for solar customers. (Milwaukee Biz Times)
• Solar panels will help power a new St. Paul baseball stadium. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)
• Construction begins on a solar project at a Michigan National Guard base. (MLive)

GRID: Invenergy completes a new 31 MW storage facility connected to Illinois solar and wind generators. (PV Tech)

KANSAS: Environmental groups are concerned industry interests won’t hold up their end of a deal that ended the state’s renewable energy standard. (Lawrence Journal-World)

UTILITIES:
• Exelon’s bid to acquire an East Coast utility is approved by Maryland regulators, advocates fear the merger will slow solar growth. (The Hill, Bloomberg)
• Wisconsin Energy’s proposed acquisition of Integrys Energy Group gets a favorable response from an Illinois administrative law judge. (Crain’s Chicago Business)

TRANSMISSION:
• Wisconsin groups petition for a new hearing for a transmission project approved by regulators last month. (La Crosse Tribune)
• Completion of a major new Minnesota transmission upgrade had a major impact on some landowners who opted to be bought out. (St. Cloud Times)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join the nation’s most successful women leaders in energy as they share their industry knowledge, strategies and experiences at the Leadership Conference for Women in Energy, June 2-3 in Indianapolis.***

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: The Michigan plant that produces batteries for the Chevy Volt is hiring more workers. (AutoBlog)

BIOENERGY: A perennial grass crop at a Cedar Rapids airport will help power the University of Iowa’s power plant. (Cedar Rapids Gazette)

Enbridge to pay $75 million for 2010 Michigan oil spill

PIPELINES: Enbidge will pay $75 million in a settlement over the 2010 Kalamazoo River oil spill. (InsideClimate News)

TRANSMISSION: A recently completed transmission line in Michigan will open up new markets for wind power and help agribusiness expand. (Midwest Energy News)

***SPONSORED LINK: Learn about the latest in renewable energy and sustainability in Central Wisconsin at The Energy Fair, June 19-21. Features include keynote speaker John Wellinghoff, workshops, exhibitors, entertainment, and more.***

COAL: A coal-fired Lake Michigan ferry will sail again this season without dumping ash into the lake. (Radio Michigan)

OIL TRAINS:
• Safety experts say new rules for tank cars don’t offer adequate fire protection. (Chicago Tribune)
• Chicago suburbs push back against rail safety rules, saying they don’t go far enough. (ABC 7 Chicago)

OIL AND GAS:
• An Iowa man who says pipeline developers offered him a prostitute plays a recording of the conversation for reporters. (Cedar Rapids Gazette)
• Nebraska landowners are suing to block a proposed injection well. (Chadron Record)
• Ohio officials will install more earthquake monitors. (Columbus Business First)
• Citizens push for a fracking moratorium in Grand Rapids. (MLive)

WIND:
• North Dakota regulators postpone a hearing on a proposed wind farm after county officials denied a permit for the project. (Forum News Service)
• A Chinese company will build 28 MW worth of community wind projects in Iowa. (WHO-TV)

SOLAR: A Michigan utility expects to have a new solar project — which will be the state’s largest — operating by summer. (MLive)

FERC: A Senate energy aide will likely replace outgoing Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioner Philip Moeller. (EnergyWire)

NUCLEAR: Ohio’s Davis-Besse plant is back online after shutting down on Saturday because of a steam leak. (Toledo Blade)

HYDRO: Why the Department of Energy says hydropower is poised for a comeback. (Utility Dive)

BIOENERGY: A bird flu crisis will create complications for a Minnesota power plant that is partially fueled by turkey manure. (Associated Press)

GRID: A joint venture plans 60 MW of energy storage in the PJM Interconnection. (Greentech Media)

COMMENTARY:
• Minnesota is at risk of losing its status as a clean energy leader. (The Equation)
• Nuclear power will play a modest — but important — role in addressing climate change. (Climate Progress)